World Breastfeeding Week

Sustaining Breastfeeding together. world breastfeeding week.

August 1-7, 2017 is World Breastfeeding Week.  This year’s theme is Sustaining Breastfeeding Together.  This year’s theme is about the importance of community and family support in a woman’s effort to breastfeed.  As a collective, family, government, healthcare providers and employers all shift and impact a mother’s experience with breastfeeding.

 

Breastfeeding provides babies the perfect nutrition, and everything they need for healthy growth and development.  Breastfeeding is good for mom too and reduces her risk for certain cancers.  The commonwealth of Virginia protects the rights of families to breastfeed whenever and wherever baby is hungry.

Babies and Young Children: A healthy start begins with on-time vaccinations.

 

National Immunization Awareness Month. Vaccines give parents the safe proven power to protect their children. A Healthy Start begins with on-time vaccinations. The first week is focused on babies and young children. Vaccines give parents the safe, proven power to protect their children from 14 serious diseases before they turn 2 years old.

  • Vaccinating your children according to the recommended schedule is one of the best ways you can protect them from 14 harmful and potentially deadly diseases like measles and whooping cough (pertussis) before their second birthday.
  • Children who don’t receive recommended vaccines are at risk of (1) getting the disease or illness and (2) having a severe case of the disease or illness. You can’t predict or know in advance if an unvaccinated child will get a vaccine-preventable disease, nor can you predict or know how severe the illness will be or become.
  • Vaccines don’t just protect your child. Immunization is a shared responsibility. Families, health care professionals and public health officials must work together to help protect the entire community – especially babies who are too young to be vaccinated themselves.

FDA Investigates Multiple Salmonella Outbreak Strains Linked to Papayas

The FDA is advising consumers not to eat Caribeña brand Maradol papayas because they are linked to an outbreak of salmonellosis. Maradol papayas are green before they ripen and turn yellow, so consumers should not eat Caribeña brand regardless of the color. If anyone has these papayas in their home, they should dispose of them immediately. CDC reports 141 cases, 45 hospitalizations and one death from 19 states in the Salmonella Kiambu and Salmonella Thompson outbreak . The states involved are CT, DE, IA, IL, KY, LA, MA, MD, MI, MN, NC, NJ, NY, OH, OK, PA, TX, VA, and WI.

For updated information on this outbreak and associated recalls, please visit VDH’s Food Recalls webpage.

Pertussis (Whooping Cough)

Pertussis is a very contagious disease characterized by severe coughing and caused by the bacteria Bordetella pertussis. Among vaccine-preventable diseases, pertussis is one of the most commonly occurring in the United States. The disease can be very serious in children less than 1 year of age when it can cause lung infections and, less often, seizures or inflammation of the brain. In rare cases, pertussis can result in death in children less than 1 year of age. Read the Pertussis FAQ.

Get Ready to Grill Safely During National Grilling Month

Did you know July is National Grilling Month? Summer is a great time for outdoor events and activities, but it’s also peak season for foodborne illness. Follow these tips for a safe and healthy grilling season:

 

 

Separate

Raw meat, poultry, and seafood items should be the last items to go in your grocery cart. Separate these raw food items from other food in your shopping cart and grocery bags. Use individual plastic bags for each raw food item to protect against cross-contamination.

Chill

Keep meat, poultry, and seafood refrigerated until you are ready to grill. Keep these items below 40°F during transport and use an insulated cooler.

Clean

Wash your hands with soap before and after handling raw meat, poultry, and seafood. Don’t forget to also wash work surfaces, utensils, and the grill before and after cooking.

Cook

Meat and poultry color is not a good indicator of safety. Use a food thermometer to check that meat is cooked enough to kill harmful germs. If you use a smoker, keep temperatures inside the smoker at 225°F to 300°F to keep meat a safe temperature while it cooks.

  • 145°F – whole cuts of beef, pork, lamb, and veal (stand-time of 3 minutes at this temperature)
  • 145°F – fish
  • 160°F – hamburgers and other ground beef
  • 165°F – all poultry and pre-cooked meats, like hot dogs

After cooking meat and poultry on the grill, keep it hot at 140 °F or warmer until it’s time to serve.

Check your grill and tools

Clean the grill with a moist cloth or paper towel before cooking. Bristles from wire bristle brushes can also dislodge and stick into food the next time you cook. Check the grill’s surface before cooking to make sure no wires are stuck.

Don’t cross-contaminate

Toss marinades and sauces that have touched raw meat juices to avoid spreading germs to cooked foods. Harmful bacteria in raw meat and juices can contaminate cooked food; use clean utensils and a clean plate to remove cooked meat from the grill.

Check out My Meal Detective for short videos on these tips and learn how to prevent and report foodborne illness. For more information on grilling and general food safety, visit the VDH Food Safety page and:

Protect the Skin That You’re In

Sunscreen is a proven way to protect yourself against sunburns and skin cancer. Use sunscreen with sun protective factor (SPF) 15 or higher, and both UVA and UVB protection. Remember to reapply sunscreen at least every 2 hours and after swimming, sweating, and toweling off.

National HIV Testing Day

Knowledge is power. national Hiv Testing Day. June 27. Virginia>AIDS

When the first test for HIV became available in 1985, it was known how HIV was spread, but not how to treat it.  Thirty years later, there are now three dozen medications to treat HIV.  People at high risk for HIV infection can take 1 pill a day to prevent getting HIV.  It is called pre-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP.  Daily PrEP reduces the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than 90%.  For people who inject drugs, it reduces the risk by more than 70%. Learn about PrEP effectiveness at Virginia > AIDS Let’s talk About PrEP.

Getting an HIV test has never been more important.  Most new HIV infections occur among persons who are unaware of their HIV status.  Early detection of HIV is crucial for HIV-positive persons to remain in good health.  For this reason, the CDC recommends that anyone between the ages of 13 and 64 be tested at least once in their lifetime.  CDC recommends those that may be at higher risk get tested more often. A general rule for those with any risk factors is to get tested at least once a year.

Learn about HIV testing options in Virginia.  Virginia locations offer both free and low-cost options with results ready in as little as one minute.  In recognition of National HIV Testing Day on June 27th, take some time out of your day to get your test for HIV.  Feel free to use the testing locator on this page to find a testing location near you.  Together, we can all do our part to end the HIV epidemic in Virginia.

Fire and EMS Memorial Week

As proclaimed by Governor McAuliffe, Fire and EMS Memorial Week is June 4-10, 2017. This event, in conjunction with the Annual Virginia Fallen Firefighters and EMS Memorial Service, honors fire and EMS providers who died in the line of duty. It also recognizes those who risk their lives daily to serve and protect the citizens of the Commonwealth. Read the Governor’s proclamation. Learn more about the Annual Virginia Fallen Firefighters and EMS Memorial Service, which will be held June 3 at 12 p.m. at the Richmond International Raceway’s Main Exhibition Hall.