International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women

The United Nations General Assembly designated November 25 as the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women. Women and girls around the world are subject to violence. Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious, preventable public health problem that affects millions of Americans. IPV can be physical, sexual or psychological harm by a current or former partner. In Virginia, 71% of victims of intimate partner homicide were women. If you or someone you know is experiencing partner violence, get help:

  • Virginia Family Violence & Sexual Assault Hotline: 1-800-838-8238
  • The LGBTQ Partner Abuse and Sexual Assault Helpline: 1-800-356-6998

Learn more:

Asmar’s Mediterranean Food, Inc. Recalls Asmar’s Original Hommus Due to Possible Health Risk

Asmar’s Mediterranean Food, Inc. of Alexandria, Va. is recalling one lot of Asmar’s Original Hommus because the product has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections to individuals with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women. Read more.

Be Food Safe This Holiday Season

food safety graphicFood safety is important for keeping your holiday gathering happy and healthy. However, food safety can be a challenge during the holiday season. Group gatherings may include more dishes than there is room for in the refrigerator or oven. Guest lists may also include those who are more vulnerable to illness, such as older people, young children, and pregnant women.

Follow these tips for a food-safe, happy holiday season:

Happy Handling

  • It’s flu season! Wash your hands well to prevent the spread of germs, using soap and clean running water for at least 20 seconds. This will help prevent the spread of bacteria from raw poultry, too.
  • Wash all fresh produce to reduce the potential for bacterial contamination.
  • Don’t forget to also wash utensils and work surfaces to protect your food and family!

Let’s Talk Turkey

Follow the tips in the infographic (right) to make sure your turkey is both delicious and safe to serve.

Cooking for a large group?

  • Prepare uncooked recipes before recipes that include raw meat. Also, store uncooked items out of the way while preparing meat dishes. These steps will help to reduce cross-contamination.
  • Cook to the proper temperature, and use a thermometer!
  • Remember the golden rule: Keep hot food hot and cold food cold! Use chafing dishes or crock pots and ice trays. Hot items should stay above 140 ˚F, and cold items should stay below 40 ˚F.
  • Discard perishable foods left out for 2 hours or more. Plan to refrigerate any leftovers within 2 hours of preparation.

Eating Out?

Follow these four tips from CDC to prevent food poisoning:

  1. Check inspections online for the restaurant you plan to go to. Restaurant inspection data for Virginia is available by health district here.
  2. Make sure that the restaurant is clean. If not, you may want to visit a different establishment.
  3. Check that your food is completely cooked. Send back any undercooked food, as it may contain harmful bacteria.
  4. Refrigerate leftovers within 4 hours of eating. Eat leftovers within 3 to 4 days from purchase.

View our My Meal Detective videos to learn how to prevent and report foodborne illness. For more information on general food safety, visit the VDH Food Safety page and:

CDC- Food Safety Tips for the Holidays and Tips for Your Holiday Turkey

FDA- Food Safety Tips for Healthy Holidays

FightBAC.org- Holiday Food Safety Resources (includes recipes and kids games and activities)

FoodSafety.gov- Thanksgiving and Winter Holidays

USDA- Seasonal Food Safety

Antibiotic Awareness Week

November 13-19 is U.S. Antibiotic Awareness Week. This annual event serves to raise awareness about safe antibiotic prescribing and use. It is important for us to know when we need antibiotics, when we do not, how best to take antibiotics, and what side effects may be caused by antibiotics.

Inappropriate use of antibiotics is a leading cause of antibiotic resistance around the world. Antibiotics are some of the most prescribed drugs, but up to half of prescriptions are not necessary or effective.  Every year in the United States, at least 2 million people get infected with bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics. And at least 23,000 people die because of these infections. When bacteria become resistant, antibiotics cannot fight them and the bacteria multiply. Some resistant bacteria can be harder to treat and can spread to other people.  By working together to appropriately use antibiotics only when they are necessary, we can decrease the number of infections caused by bacteria resistant to antibiotics.

I encourage you to do these things to stay antibiotics aware:

  • Get the facts about antibiotics. Antibiotics do not work on viruses such as colds and flu, or runny noses, even if the mucus is thick, yellow or green. When antibiotics aren’t needed, they won’t help you and the side effects could still hurt you.
  • Ask your healthcare provider about the best way to feel better while your body fights off a virus. Pain relievers, fever reducers, saline nasal spray or drops, warm compresses, liquids and rest may help.
  • If you need antibiotics, take them exactly as prescribed. Talk with your healthcare provider if you have any questions about your antibiotics or if you develop any side effects. Be sure to talk with them if you have diarrhea, since that could be a Clostridium difficile ( C. difficile) infection, which should be treated.
  • Stay healthy and keep others healthy by washing your hands, covering your coughs and staying home when you are sick. Be sure to get recommended vaccines for infections like the flu.
  1. C. difficile is the infection most often associated with healthcare exposure and recent antibiotic use. In Virginia’s Plan for Well-Being, we track progress towards the prevention of C. difficile infections. In 2016, Virginia acute care hospitals reported more than 2,300 C. difficile infections. To meet the national prevention goal, hospitals would need to prevent more than 600 C. difficile infections per year.

Learn more by visiting: www.cdc.gov/antibiotic-use.

Want to help in an emergency? Sign up for the Va MRC

medical reserve corps at an eventWhen emergencies like hurricanes hit Virginia, there are ways you can help. One way is by joining the Virginia Medical Reserve Corps (MRC).  Virginia’s MRC is a force of dedicated volunteers who stand ready to support the community in the event of a public health emergency. Each of Virginia’s 27 local MRC units is comprised of teams of medical and public health professionals who, along with interested community members, volunteer their skills, expertise and time to support ongoing public health initiatives and assist during emergencies throughout Virginia. Learn more and sign up.

What you need to know about Vibrio

Vibrio

Roughly a dozen Vibrio species are known to cause a bacterial disease called vibriosis in humans, with the most common in the United States being V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, and V. alginolyticus. The Vibrio species that cause vibriosis naturally live in the salt or brackish (i.e., somewhat salty) waters of Virginia’s coastal zone. People with vibriosis become infected by eating raw or undercooked seafood or exposing a wound to seawater. Most infections occur from May through October when water temperatures are warmer.  Vibrio vulnificus, in particular, can cause severe or fatal infections. Individuals with pre-existing medical conditions such as liver disease, diabetes, HIV, cancer, and certain stomach disorders are at greater risk of becoming sick with vibriosis and experiencing severe complications.

Remember these helpful tips for preventing Vibrio infection:

  • Eat cooked seafood, which tastes just as delicious!
  • Avoid contact with seawater or preparing raw seafood such as oysters and shrimp if you have an open wound, even if it’s a minor cut or scrape. Or cover your wound with a waterproof bandage.
  • Wash wounds and cuts with soap and clean water if they have been exposed to seawater, raw seafood, or juices from seafood.

Learn more about Vibrio.

Traveling This Fall?

travelers in airportBefore you take off for a getaway, business trip, or family visit, there are some things you should know about Zika. Use these tips to plan ahead:

Before your  trip:

  • If you are pregnant, do not travel to an area with Zika. If you or your partner are trying to get pregnant, talk to your healthcare provider before traveling to an area with Zika.
  • Check the latest travel recommendations from the CDC

During your  trip:

  • Protect yourself from mosquito bites
  • Keep mosquitoes outside by staying in places with air-conditioning and windows and doors, or use a bed net

After your  trip:

Tricks and Treats for Having a Food Safe Halloween

Avoid the real horrors of Halloween by learning how to keep you and your family members safe from foodborne illness. Follow these tips to scare away food safety hazards:

  • Remind kids (and adults!) to wash their hands before and after enjoying their Halloween treats.
  • Going trick or treating?
    • Inspect candy before eating. Look for signs of tampering, such as an unusual appearance, discoloration, tiny pinholes, or tears in wrappers.
    • If your child has a food allergy, check food labels to make sure the allergen is not present.
  • Hosting a Halloween party?
    • Prevent frightful bacteria from multiplying by keeping foods at the right temperature. Don’t keep perishable foods out for more than two hours at room temperature (or 1 hour in temperatures above 90°F).
    • If you bake Halloween treats, don’t taste dough and batters that contain uncooked eggs. These items may harbor Salmonella, bacteria that can cause food poisoning. Salmonella live on both the outside and inside of normal-looking eggs.
    • Beware of spooky cider! Unpasteurized juice or cider can contain harmful bacteria such as coli and Salmonella. Serve products labeled as pasteurized to keep these bacteria from creeping up on you.
    • Say “boo” to bacteria during a bobbing for apples game. Rinse apples and other raw fruits under cool running water, and use a produce brush to remove surface dirt.

View our My Meal Detective videos to learn how to prevent and report foodborne illness. For more information on general food safety, visit the VDH Food Safety page and:

CDC- Food Safety

FDA- Halloween Food Safety Tips for Parents

Fight BAC!- Halloween Food Safety How-To

FoodSafety.gov- Avoid “Nightmares” on Halloween: Food Safety Tips

StateFoodSafety.com- Food Safety Talkabout: Halloween

Breast Cancer Awareness

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. In 2014, there were 6,471 new cases of breast cancer in Virginia. Every Woman’s Life (EWL) helps low-income, uninsured women between the ages of 18-64 get FREE breast cancer screening. If these tests lead to a cancer diagnosis, successful treatment can increase dramatically with early detection. Find out if you are eligible for EWL, and schedule your annual screening today.

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Domestic Violence, also known as intimate partner violence, happens to 37% of US women and almost 31% of US men. Intimate partner violence includes:

  • physical violence,
  • sexual violence,
  • threats of physical or sexual violence,
  • stalking and
  • emotional or psychological abuse

by a current or former intimate partner. This type of violence can happen to anyone, even if you aren’t sexually intimate. It can range from a single episode of violence to severe episodes over many years.

In Virginia there were 124 family and intimate partner homicides, which is 32% of all homicides. Almost 3 out of 4 victims of intimate partner homicide are women.

If you or someone you know needs help, call the Virginia Family Violence & Sexual Assault Hotline, 1-800-838-8238 or the LGBTQ Partner Abuse and Sexual Assault Helpline, 1-800-356-6998. If you are not able to call you can text, 804-793-9999. If you are in immediate danger, please call 911.