NPHW Friday: Climate Change

Today is the fifth day of National Public Health Week, the day’s theme melds with one of our newer initiatives – the Public Health impacts of Climate Change.

Friday’s Theme is Climate Change

Friday,. April 5. National Public Health Week. Climate Change. NPHW 2019 Virginia. Virginia Department of Health. Group of people cleaning up a beach.

Last fall, Dr. Oliver conducted a “Listening Tour” across the state, meeting with local health officials and community members to better understand the health needs and concerns of those we serve.  As the tour progressed, it became apparent that the public health impacts of climate change are of high concern for Virginians.

In response to those concerns, Dr. Oliver requested a VDH internal working group be established to assess the public health impacts of climate change and to outline our agency data and resources to address this issue.  In January of 2019, the VDH Climate Change Committee, or “C-3,” was formed. The C-3 includes representatives from VDH’s offices of Environmental Health, Drinking Water, Epidemiology, Emergency Preparedness and Health Equity.

View our Toolkit for more information about National Public Health Week.

NPHW Thursday: Technology and Public Health

Thursday. April 4. National Public Health Week. Technology and Public Health. NPHW 2019 Virginia. Virginia Department of Health. someone syncing their fitness watch with their phone.National Public Health Week: Creating the Healthiest State: For science. For action. For health.

Today is the fourth day of National Public Health Week, a time to recognize the contributions of public health and highlight issues that are important to improving our nation’s health.

Thursday: Technology and Public Health

New technologies are quickly transforming the public health landscape and can be a potent public health tool. The Virginia Department of Health Data Portal was developed to provide a convenient, interactive access point for health-related data for the state of Virginia. This portal is a comprehensive source for community health assessment, public health and population health data that is open to all. It provides interactive data at the most granular level available, and is updated continually with new information as it becomes available.

Visit www.vdh.virginia.gov/data/ to access the Data Portal.

View our Toolkit for more information about National Public Health Week.

NPHW Wednesday: Rural Health

Wednesday. April 3. National Public Health Week. Rural Health. NPHW 2019 Virginia. Virginia Department of Health. Child riding a bike.National Public Health Week: Creating the Healthiest State: For science. For action. For health.

Today is the third day of National Public Health Week, a time to recognize the contributions of public health and highlight issues that are important to improving our nation’s health.

Wednesday: Rural Health

Virginia’s rural areas are often tight-knit communities full of mutual respect, hard work, and determination. These communities also face unique challenges such as a lack of health care providers, access to health care and affordability issues. The Virginia State Office of Rural Health within the Office of Rural Health aims to address and rectify health disparities affecting the state’s rural residents by helping develop long-term solutions to rural health problems or their root causes. Learn more about the Virginia State Office of Rural Health.

View our Toolkit for more information about National Public Health Week.

NPHW Tuesday: Violence Prevention

Tuesday. April 2. National Public Health Week. Violence Prevention. NPHW 2019 Virginia. Virginia Department of Health. child with stop bulling written on his palms.National Public Health Week: Creating the Healthiest State: For science. For action. For health.

Today is the second day of National Public Health Week, a time to recognize the contributions of public health and highlight issues that are important to improving our nation’s health.

Tuesday: Violence Prevention

The Virginia Department of Health provides many resources about preventing many kinds of violence in our communities. Resources include

April is also Child Abuse Prevention Month.

View our Toolkit for more information about National Public Health Week.

NPHW Monday: Healthy Communities

Monday. April 1. National Public Health Week. Health Communities. NOHW 2019 Virginia. Virginia Department of Health. Family jogging.

National Public Health Week: Creating the Healthiest State: For science. For action. For health.

Today is the first day of National Public Health Week, a time to recognize the contributions of public health and highlight issues that are important to improving our nation’s health.

Monday: Healthy Communities

Health begins where Virginians live, work, and play. Virginia’s Plan for Well-Being highlights specific goals and strategies for communities to give everyone a chance to live a healthy life. Every Virginian deserves the opportunity to be healthy, and you, too, can help make that possible. Join us in this effort to assure well-being for all Virginians.

View our Toolkit for more information about National Public Health Week.

National Public Health Week: Creating the Healthiest State: For science. For action. For health.

National Public Health Week. Creating the Healthiest nation: for science. for action. for health. april 1-7, 2019During the first full week of April each year, the American Public Health Association (APHA) brings together communities across the United States to observe National Public Health Week. This observation is used as a time to recognize the contributions of public health and highlight issues that are important to improving our nation and the Commonwealth of Virginia.

View our Toolkit for more information about National Public Health Week.

World TB Day – March 24, 2019

It's Time to End TB. World TB Day. March 24

For many decades, death was likely for people with tuberculosis (TB). World TB Day celebrates the day in 1882 when Dr. Robert Koch discovered the cause of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is a small rod-shaped bacteria.   At the time of Koch’s announcement, TB was raging through both Europe and the Americas. It caused the death of one out of every seven people.  Dr. Koch’s discovery was an important step toward the control and elimination of this deadly disease.

 

Scientists later learned that there are two types of TB Conditions:

  • TB Disease and
  • Latent (or inactive) TB infection.

People with TB Disease are sick from active TB bacteria.  They usually have symptoms such as cough, fever, tiredness, or weight loss.  They may spread the bacteria to others.

People with latent TB infection:

  • Do not feel sick,
  • Do not have symptoms, and
  • Cannot spread TB bacteria to others.

If left untreated, the inactive, non-contagious form of TB can become an infectious form of the disease.

TB in Virginia

TB was the first disease that the Virginia Department of Health (VDH) addressed when it was formed in 1908.  At that time, VDH had a staff of four and a budget of $40,000. At least half of the budget was used to help the 12,100 Virginians living with TB at that time.  Today, TB remains an important preventable disease in Virginia.  Treating cases of infectious TB disease is important, but it’s only the tip of the iceberg.  We will never end TB without screening people for latent TB infection and treating it to prevent its progression.   Treatment for LTBI can be as short as one dose of medicine a week for 12 weeks!

Should you be screened for latent (or inactive) TB Infection?  You may want to contact your health provider or local health department if you:

  • Have close contact (in your home or workplace) with a person with infectious TB disease;
  • Have lived or visited for 3 months or more in a country where tuberculosis is common;
  • Have been homeless and lived in a shelter or other setting where many people live together;
  • Have a medical condition that makes it hard for your body to fight infections, such as diabetes mellitus, severe kidney disease or HIV infection;
  • Take medical treatments such as steroids on a regular basis or take special medicines for rheumatoid arthritis or Crohn’s Disease.

Want more information about Latent Tuberculosis Infections?  Please visit:

Child and Adult Care Food Program Week

Virginia will celebrate its CACFP week on March 17-23, 2019. The CACFP brings healthy foods to tables across the country for children in childcare centers, homes, afterschool programs and adults in day care. Last year the program raised awareness with hundreds visiting the site and on social. Don’t miss out on the fun, follow the program and share along with these hashtags #VACACFP #CACFPWeek #QualityChildCare. For more information, visit here.

Download a free children’s activity book.

Groundwater Awareness Week

Life as we know it would be impossible without groundwater. It is the world’s most extracted natural resource, and it supports our ecosystems. Don’t take groundwater for granted. Pay it forward during National Groundwater Awareness Week, March 10-16, 2019, by letting others know the importance of groundwater and asking them to pass it along.

Groundwater is the world’s most extracted raw material with withdrawal rates in the estimated range of 259 trillion gallons per year. Find out more at ngwa.org/GWAW2019 #GWAW

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. The VDH Cancer Prevention and Control Program works to decrease the burden of colorectal and other cancers through helping to develop and promote evidence-based strategies shown to prevent and control cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death. However, CRC screening makes dying from this disease preventable. During this month, we want to continue to spread the message that CRC is “Preventable. Treatable. Beatable!”

Colorectal cancer is cancer that occurs in the colon or rectum. It is also called colon cancer, for short. Sometimes abnormal growths, called polyps, form in the colon or rectum. Over time, some polyps may turn into cancer. Screening tests can find polyps so they can be removed before turning into cancer. Screening also helps find colorectal cancer at an early stage, when treatment works best.

To learn more about decreasing CRC risks, visit this page at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): http://bit.ly/2Fjfs7t.