October 26 is Prescription Drug Take Back Day

October 26, 2019 is the National Prescription Drug Take Back Day.  Follow this link to find a collection site near you for an opportunity safely and anonymously turn in prescription drugs.  This can prevent drug addiction and overdose deaths, and can also prevent accidental poisoning to children or pets.  Turning in prescription drugs is a safe alternative to flushing drugs into public wastewater systems, which can end up in drinking water and pollute the environment.

If you cannot attend this event, contact your local police department about future events, or follow the EPA’s recommendations.

New Fish Consumption Advisory for the Nottoway River

The Virginia Department of Health (VDH) has issued an advisory on blue catfish consumption due to elevated mercury in blue catfish caught in the Nottoway River.

Recent fish tissue sample results from the Nottoway River in 2017 and 2018 show mercury levels in blue catfish exceed the amount considered safe for long-term human consumption.

More information is available in the press release for this advisory. Information on fish consumption advisories across the state can be found at http://fishadvisories.vdh.virginia.gov/.

Vaping and Lung Disease

Vaping and Lung Disease

Recently CDC has started investigating 450 possible cases across multiple states of a lung disease associated with vaping. As of September 5, six confirmed cases have been reported in Virginia. Information on this illness in Virginia can be found on the Virginia Department of Health page on Severe Lung Illness Associated with Vaping. No specific product has been identified as the cause yet, although many people affected report vaping THC oil.
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Pool Chemical Injuries

Treating pools with chemicals is important to prevent the spread of disease.  However, improper storage or use of these chemicals can cause injury.  Most chemicals used to treat pools contain chlorine or bromine, which can irritate the skin, eyes, mucous membranes, and respiratory tract.  Treatment primarily consists of removal from the source and supportive care

Most of these injuries take place at private residences, so it is important to use pool chemicals properly and keep them safely stored away from children and pets.  For more information, visit the Blue Ridge Poison Control Center website: https://med.virginia.edu/toxicology/wp-content/uploads/sites/268/2019/06/Jun19-PoolChemicals.pdf

Lead and Firing Ranges

Target Shooting and Lead

People who routinely go target shooting are at increased risk for exposure to lead. When a gun is fired, lead dust and vapors are released and can be breathed in or settle on the skin, hair, or clothes. Lead has no biological role in the body, and no level of lead is known to be safe. Lead is especially harmful to children, and can contribute to learning disabilities or ADHD.

Protect Your Child from Lead

It only takes a small amount of lead to raise a child’s blood lead level. Lead dust brought home from a shooting range on shoes or clothing can settle on floors, then be picked up on objects or a child’s hands, and from there taken to a child’s mouth. After going shooting, wash your hands, arms, and face to remove lead from your skin. Change your clothes when you get home and wash them separately. Keep down the amount of lead dust in the home through regular wet cleaning of floors. If you shoot regularly and have a child who is less than 6 years old, talk to your child’s doctor about lead poisoning and whether your child should be tested.

For more information for indoor gun range owners, employees, and customers, please see our handout on Lead and Firing Ranges fact sheet.

Kratom

What is kratom?

Kratom is an herbal extract made from the leaves of a tropical evergreen tree. It is sold as a herbal supplement in the United States. Kratom has some properties similar to opiates, but also can act as a mild stimulant. Some people take kratom to reduce opiate cravings or treat pain. Others take it recreationally, believing it helps improve mood.

Why am I hearing so much about kratom lately?

Kratom was first introduced into the US in the late 1990s and for years its use was very limited. In recent years kratom use has become much more common, possibly because of the opiate epidemic and people trying to use kratom to reduce their dependence on opiates. A new study on Poison Control Center calls related to kratom found they’ve become much more common in the past few years. In 2011 Poison Control Centers received 13 calls about kratom. This rose to 682 in 2017, and two-thirds of the 1807 kratom-related calls between 2011–2017 happened in 2016 and 2017.

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October 21-27 is National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week

Lead is Still Found in Many Homes

Lead is a toxic metal that is still present in and around many homes in lead-based paint and urban soils. Lead can also be tracked in if parents have jobs or hobbies that expose them to lead. Children who are exposed to lead at a young age are at increased risk for speech delay, learning disabilities, and ADHD. A simple blood test can tell if your child has been exposed to lead. If you have children under six years old, ask your doctor if they might be at risk for lead poisoning. See the EPA’s home page on lead for more information.

Protect Your Child from Lead Around Your Home

If you live in a home built before 1978 your home may contain lead paint. Use a damp rag to clean up any paint chips.  Frequent wet cleaning will remove dust and dirt that could contain lead. Leave shoes by the door to avoid tracking in lead, and don’t let your child play in bare dirt around the house. If you do renovation projects, hire a contractor with RRP certification or follow guidelines for safe do-it-yourself renovation.

Lead Abatement Assistance is Available in Richmond and Roanoke

The cities of Richmond and Roanoke have obtained federal grants that will help pay to control lead hazards in private homes for qualifying homeowners. Residents of those cities who are interested should contact their local health department.

Who Do I Contact For Help With Mold Removal?

Rental Properties/Apartments 
If you live in an apartment and you feel that your landlord/property manager has not promptly addressed your concerns, please contact the Virginia Office of the Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Section. The Office of Consumer Protection provides information to individuals on matters related to landlord-tenant issues, and can be reached at either 804-786-2042 or 1-800-552-9963.  Additionally, the Virginia Residential Landlord and Tenant Act (Sections 55-248.2 through 55-248.40 of the Code of Virginia) establishes the rights and obligations of residential landlords and tenants in the Commonwealth, but only the courts can enforce those rights and obligations.  To review the Act, please click on Virginia Residential Landlord & Tenant Act.

Residential Homes
moldremedIf you own a residential home, it is recommended to contact a mold assessment, remediation, or removal company that holds a certification from the American Industrial Hygiene Association. The Virginia Department of Health (VDH) does not assess the credentials of, or make recommendations regarding, specific mold specialists.

 

NOTE: VDH does not have the capability to provide environmental testing or remediation for mold problems. Concerned citizens are advised to follow the practical advice given on this site, refer to additional resources, and if necessary, consult an environmental specialist.

Crumb Rubber Playing Fields

What is crumb rubber?

Crumb rubber is recycled rubber that is cut into tiny pieces and spread on playing fields and playgrounds. On playing fields it is typically covered with artificial turf, but on playground may be used as an alternative to mulch, or laid as a smooth surface.  Crumb rubber is used on these playing surfaces because it is springy and protects people from injury when they fall, provides a flat surface, requires minimal maintenance, and no watering or pesticides.
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