New River Health District FREE HIV and STI testing!

Check out our mobile unit!

New River Health District is offering FREE and CONFIDENTIAL testing for several sexually transmitted infections (STIs) at offsite locations in the community each month! New River Health District serves the counties of Floyd, Giles, Montgomery, and Pulaski as well as Radford City. We are currently offering testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, and syphilis.


Why get tested?When and where can I get tested? |  What are the risk factors?Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)Hepatitis BHepatitis CSyphilis


Why get tested?

KNOW YOUR STATUS! Most STIs show no symptoms, but early detection, referral, and treatment of STIs can help reduce the complications that often result from infection. Testing is free, and we provide counseling and education on strategies to reduce the risk of infection or re-infection. Results will be available within 2 weeks.

In these testing situations, the client provides his or her name, but the results of the test are confidential. Although Virginia state law requires the names of people who test positive for STIs be reported to the health department, this information is for disease surveillance and control purposes only.


Back to top


When and where can I get tested?

We hold testing events at the same times and locations throughout New River Health District every month. We are exploring new sites, so stay tuned!

We will not hold events during holidays.

June 2019

Floyd County

New River Community Action, Floyd – 120 Epperly Mill Road, Floyd, VA 24091

Giles County

Hillside Apartments – 408A Church Avenue, Pearisburg, VA 24134

Gateway Village Apartments – 303 Knob St, Rich Creek, VA 24147

Montgomery County

Christiansburg Library – 125 Sheltman Street, Christiansburg, VA 24073

Schiffert Health Center, Virginia Tech – 895 Washington Street SW, Blacksburg, VA 24061

McComas Hall, Virginia Tech – 895 Washington Street SW, Blacksburg, VA 24061

Squires Student Center – 290 College Avenue, Blacksburg, VA 24061

Pulaski County

Pulaski Medical – 1006 East Main Street, Pulaski, VA 24301

Radford City

401 Peer Center – 401 W Main Street, Radford, VA 24141

Radford Public Library – 30 W Main Street, Radford, VA 24141

Bisset Park – 49 Berkley Williams Dr, Radford, VA 24141


Back to top


What are the risk factors?

HIV, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, and syphilis can all be spread through sexual intercourse, but there are other behaviors that can put someone at risk for these infections as well. Below are several risk factors that can increase someone’s chances of infection:

  • Having anal, vaginal, or oral sex without a condom
  • Having multiple sex partners
  • Having anonymous sex partners
  • Having sex while under the influence of drugs or alcohol can lower inhibitions and result in greater sexual risk taking
  • Current or past injection drug use, especially when sharing needles/syringes – this mostly applies to HIV, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C
  • Receiving unprofessional tattoos – this mostly applies to Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C

Data and information in this section were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). For more in-depth information, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/std/default.htm.    

Photos courtesy of CDC. Stock photos. Posed by models.

Back to top


Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

What is it?

HIV is a virus that attacks the body’s immune system. When the body’s immune system is not working properly, it is vulnerable to severe illness or death when exposed to different infections. Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is the most severe stage of HIV.

Data and information in this section were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For more in-depth information, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/index.html.

How is it spread?

HIV can be spread in several different ways:

  • Sexual contact with blood, semen, or other body fluids
  • Sharing needles/syringes
  • From mother to child during pregnancy

What are the symptoms?

The 3 stages of HIV include acute illness, clinical latency, and AIDS.

Acute: In the acute illness, a person may experience a flu-like illness within a few weeks of being exposed to HIV. During the acute stage, a person is able to spread the virus to others.

Clinical latency: During clinical latency, a person usually does not show any symptoms, but he or she is still able to spread the virus.

AIDS: AIDS is the most severe stage of HIV infection. Common symptoms include fever, chills, weakness, and weight loss. The body’s immune system has been badly damaged and is unable to fight off infections that would not normally make someone sick. A person is able to spread the virus in this stage as well.

Can it be treated?

HIV can be controlled with medication, but there is no cure. It is important to begin treatment as soon as possible to avoid progressing to more severe illness.

 There’s a Pill to Prevent HIV?

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a daily pill taken by a person who does not have HIV to protect against HIV. It does not protect against other STIs. Visit virginia.greaterthan.org or call (800) 533-4148 for more info!


Back to top


Hepatitis B

What is it?

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a virus that attacks the liver. A person can develop an acute (short-term) illness or a chronic (long-term) illness, both of which can damage the liver.

Data and information in this section were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For more in-depth information, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hbv/.

  • Sharing needles/syringes
  • Sex with an infected person
  • From mother to child at birth
  • Exposure to blood from an infected person

How is it spread?

HBV can be spread in several different ways:

  • Sharing needles/syringes
  • Sex with an infected person
  • From mother to child at birth
  • Exposure to blood from an infected person

What are the symptoms?

Hepatitis B can be either an acute or a chronic illness, but symptoms do not always show in someone who was recently infected.

Acute hepatitis B: During the acute illness of hepatitis B, a person may experience symptoms such as fever, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, or jaundice (yellow color of the eyes and/or skin). This illness can last anywhere from a few weeks to up to 6 months.

Chronic hepatitis B: During chronic hepatitis B infection, there are often no symptoms until the person has been infected for years. The symptoms are similar to those of acute illness, but this can be a sign of advanced liver disease. Long term hepatitis B infection can result in liver scarring, called cirrhosis, or liver cancer.

Can it be treated?

There is not a medicine available to treat an acute hepatitis B infection. The acute illness is treated with rest, good nutrition, and fluids but may require hospitalization.

There are treatments available for chronic hepatitis B, but there is no cure. Consult with a doctor that has experience treating hepatitis B.

There is a vaccine for hepatitis B! Contact your local health department for more information.


Back to top


Hepatitis C

What is it?

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a virus that attacks the liver. A person can develop an acute (short-term) illness or a chronic (long-term) illness, both of which can damage the liver. HCV is a different virus than HBV, but the ways in which it is spread and the illness that it causes are similar.

Data and information in this section were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For more in-depth information, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hcv/index.htm.

How is it spread?

HCV can be spread in several ways, with exposure to an infected person’s blood being the main risk:

  • Sharing needles/syringes
  • Unregulated tattoos and piercings
  • Sex with an infected person
  • From mother to child at birth

What are the symptoms?

Hepatitis C can be either an acute or a chronic illness, but symptoms do not always show in someone who was recently infected.

Acute hepatitis C: During the acute illness of hepatitis C, a person may experience symptoms such as fever, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, or jaundice (yellow color of the eyes and/or skin).

Chronic hepatitis C: During chronic hepatitis C infection, there are often no symptoms until the person has been infected for years. The symptoms are similar to those of acute illness, but this can be a sign of advanced liver disease.

Can it be treated?

There is not a recommended treatment for acute hepatitis C. Follow up with a doctor is needed to determine if the infection becomes chronic.

There is a cure for hepatitis C available! Consult with a doctor that has experience treating hepatitis C.

There is no vaccine available for hepatitis C.


Back to top


Syphilis

What is it?

Syphilis is an infection caused by a bacteria that is spread through sexual contact. It can cause serious health problems if left untreated.

Data and information in this section were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For more in-depth information, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/std/syphilis/.

 How is it spread?

Syphilis can be spread through vaginal, anal, and oral sex. It can also be spread from mother to child during pregnancy.

 What are the symptoms?

There are several stages of syphilis, and each has different symptoms.

Primary syphilis: During primary syphilis, there is usually a painless sore called a chancre located in or around the penis, vagina, mouth, anus, or rectum.

Secondary syphilis: During secondary syphilis, there is sometimes a skin rash, swollen lymph nodes, and a fever. The symptoms can be mild and go unnoticed.

Latent syphilis: During latent syphilis, there are usually no signs or symptoms of illness.

Tertiary syphilis: During tertiary syphilis, the heart, brain, and other organs of the body can be affected.

Can it be treated?

There is a treatment for syphilis! Antibiotics can cure the infection, but they will not undo any damage that has already been done. It is important to seek treatment as soon as possible! Contact your local health department for more information.


Back to top


Contact us!

If you would like more information or have a question about our services, please call 540-585-3355.