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September 12, 2011

For More Information Contact

  • Gordon Green, M.D., director, West Piedmont Health District, 276-638-2311
  • Robert Parker, public information officer, Western Region, 540-381-7100, ext. 151

HEALTH DEPARTMENTS OFFER FREE, CONFIDENTIAL HIV TESTING ON SEPTEMBER 27
-- Testing for sexually transmitted illnesses also is available weekly --

(MARTINSVILLE, Va.) – On Tuesday, September 27, 2011 the West Piedmont Health District will hold special clinics to provide free, confidential testing for HIV. These clinics will be held from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the following locations:

  • Franklin County Health Department, 365 Pell Ave., Rocky Mount, 540-484-0292.
  • Henry-Martinsville Health Department, 295 Commonwealth Blvd., Martinsville, 276-638-2311.
  • Patrick County Health Department, 106 Rucker St., Stuart, 276-693-2070.

Testing for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections also is routinely available at the Franklin County and Henry-Martinsville Health Departments, as follows:

  • Each Monday from 1 to 2:45 p.m. (by appointment) - Franklin County Health Department, 365 Pell Ave., Rocky Mount, 540-484-0292.
  • Each Wednesday from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. (by appointment) and 1 to 3 p.m. (walk-in) - Henry-Martinsville Health Department, 295 Commonwealth Blvd., Martinsville, 276-638-2311.

“If you feel that you have been exposed to the virus through contact with infected blood or body fluids, or if you have engaged in any at-risk behaviors even one time, you should get an HIV test,” said Gordon Green, M.D., director of the West Piedmont Health District. “Early HIV diagnosis is critical, so people who are infected can fully benefit from available life-saving treatments.” Estimates suggest that about one in five Virginians that are living with HIV do not know that they are infected with HIV. Currently, almost 40 percent of people with HIV are not diagnosed until they already have developed AIDS. Finding out whether you are infected with HIV is the first step to improving your health and the health of your partners and your family.

The test for HIV is a blood test which determines if the body has had an immune response to the virus. It takes time for the body to produce such a response. So if a possible exposure occurred less than three months before the first test, a second test should be done three months after the first. If you are routinely putting yourself at risk, being tested every six months is recommended.

For more information, please call your local health department or visit www.hhs.gov/aidsawarenessdays/days/testing/index.html.


Last Updated: 09-16-2011

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