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June 7, 2013

For More Information Contact:

  • Michelle Stoll, Virginia Department of Health, 804-864-7963
  • Elaine J. Lidholm, Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, 804-786-7686

State Officials Warn Consumers of Possible Contamination of Frozen Berry Blends
Certain Lots of Berry Products May be Contaminated with Hepatitis A Virus

Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services(Richmond, Va.) The Virginia Department of Health and Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services warn consumers not to eat certain lots of frozen Townsend Farms Organic Antioxidant Berry Blend sold under the Harris Teeter brand in Virginia, as they may be linked to a multistate outbreak of hepatitis A infections.

The product was sold in Harris Teeter stores from April 20 until June 1, 2013, under the name Harris Teeter Organic Antioxidant Berry Blend, 10 oz. bag and UPC 0 72036 70463 4, with Lot Codes of T041613E or T041613C and a “BEST BY” code of 101614.

People who have bought this product should discard it if they still have it in their homes. Anyone who has consumed this specific product in the last 14 days and has not been vaccinated against hepatitis A should contact their health care provider to discuss possible hepatitis A prevention and treatment options. 

Harris Teeter has removed this product from stores and posted a recall notice on the company website at http://www.harristeeter.com/other/consumer_information/recalls.aspx?id=52 . Further information about this outbreak is available from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration.

To date, 61 cases of illness are being investigated nationwide. No cases have been reported in Virginia. 

Symptoms of hepatitis A infection include fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dark urine, clay-colored bowel movements, joint pain and jaundice (a yellowing of the skin or eyes). Symptoms develop two to six weeks after consuming contaminated food or drink and can last from one week to several months. If you consumed the product and are ill, you should contact your health care provider.

Most people recover completely, but hepatitis A can cause serious illness. It is very important that people who have symptoms of hepatitis A do not go to work, especially if they work in food service, health care or child care. For more information on hepatitis A, please visit http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/Epidemiology/factsheets/Hepatitis_A.htm.


Last Updated: 06-10-2013

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