U.S. Travelers

The situation in the U.S. is rapidly evolving. Sustained community transmission of COVID-19 is occurring in multiple locations throughout the United States.

Before travel, determine if COVID-19 is spreading at or near your destination. Check here for U.S. states or here for U.S. cities and counties. Check here for international locations. Get important information as you consider traveling to different cities and states across the United States here.

All travelers should check with the state or local health department where you are, along your route, and where you will be visiting to get the most up to date information, in case there are travel restrictions, stay-at-home orders or quarantine requirements upon arrival, state border closures, or other requirements. Plan to keep checking for updates as you travel.

Current considerations for domestic travelers are posted on the CDC’s Coronavirus and Travel in the United States page.

Here are examples of activities and situations that can increase your risk of exposure to COVID-19:

  • Being in an area that is experiencing high levels of COVID-19 spread. You can check the levels for places you traveled, including countries as well as S. states, territories, counties, and cities.
  • Going to a large social gathering like a wedding, funeral, or party.
  • Attending a mass gathering like a sporting event, concert, or parade.
  • Being in crowds — for example, in restaurants, bars, airports, bus and train stations, or movie theaters.
  • Traveling on a cruise ship or river boat.

If you participated in higher risk activities or think that you may have been exposed before or during your trip, take extra precautions (in addition the ones listed above) to protect others for 14 days after arrival or return.

Some types of travel and activities are higher risk for exposure to COVID-19 (see list below).  If your family member participated in higher risk activities or may have been exposed before or during their trip, they should take extra precautions to protect others for 14 days after arrival:

Here are examples of activities and situations that can increase travel related risk of exposure to COVID-19:

  • Being in an area that is experiencing high levels of COVID-19 spread. You can check the levels for places traveled, including countries, S. states and territories, counties, and cities.
  • Going to a large social gathering like a wedding, funeral, or party.
  • Attending a mass gathering like a sporting event, concert, or parade.
  • Being in crowds – for example, in restaurants, bars, airports, bus and train stations, or movie theaters.
  • Traveling on a cruise ship or river boat.

If you have traveled or if you are thinking of traveling within the U.S., check the appropriate state recommendations and mandates before travel and understand how to travel safely and take the most precautions possible. Practice social distancing. Wear a mask. Wash your hands frequently. Avoid large groups of people. Get tested if possible before you go. Follow all precautions when you return. If you are planning to travel for an upcoming holiday, see CDC’s information about Holiday Celebrations.

Yes. Since COVID-19 activity is widespread in multiple states, it is recommended and required in some states that travelers wear a mask during travel regardless of the travel destination. It is recommended that appropriate masks be worn by all passengers from ages five and older and by all personnel operating the conveyance while on public transportation conveyances (e.g., airplanes, ships, ferries, trains, subways, buses, taxis, ride-shares) and at transportation hubs and other locations where people board such conveyances (e.g. airports, bus or ferry terminals, train stations, seaports).Other important infection prevention and control measures include:

  • Avoid all non-essential travel and stay at home as much as possible.
  • Avoid close contact with sick people.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning product.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60%–95% alcohol.
  • Those with underlying risk factors for serious illness should consult with their healthcare provider before travel.

See CDC Recommendation Regarding the Use of Masks here.

Consistent with CDC guidance, Virginia currently does not have any quarantine requirements for people arriving in the Commonwealth from other U.S. locations, as of August 13, 2020.

See How can I avoid getting COVID-19 in the Disease Prevention section.

 

Page last reviewed: November 25, 2020