Algal Bloom Surveillance Map


The map is updated regularly during the months of March – November. Please click on map points for the most recent sample results.

**NOTE**While results may indicate no or low risk to human health, the Health Department does not recommend recreational contact with waters with active algal blooms. An algae bloom may be an indication of a water quality issue.


Below is information on bloom investigations for 2017 we would like to feature…


Algal bloom investigation of John. W. Flannagan Reservoir, Dickinson County. Photo taken of
bloom along the dam shore, looking toward the boat ramp. 
From February – March 2017. READ MORE…

Photo Credit: US Army Corp of Engineers  – Huntington District February 2016


Below is information on bloom investigations from 2016 we would like to feature…


Alexandrium monilatum Harmful Algal Bloom – Aerial photography of the bloom looking north
to New Point Comfort (upper right), Mobjack Bay (upper left) and Goodwin Island.
From August – October 2016. READ MORE…

Photo Credit: Wolf Vogelbein, VIMS

 

Woodstock Pond at York River State Park, Microcystin aeruginosa bloom with human health advisory from August – December 2016.


How do I report an Algal Bloom or Fish Kill?

If you are concerned that you have been exposed to a harmful algal bloom, please see your doctor or call your local health department. Telling your doctor about contact with water may help him/her treat the illness properly.

*NEW* – Click Here to Report a HAB Online  

Questions about health effects and algal blooms, call: The Virginia Department of Health                                      HAB Hotline: (888) 238-6154
To report discolored water (red, brown, or green) with an odd odor, or dead fish in the water, call: The Department of Environmental Quality:                  (757) 518-2000
To report fish with lesions, call: The Virginia Institute of Marine Science:                         (804) 684-7000

For information on federal policy and guidance, including advisory thresholds for algal toxins in drinking water, please visit the EPA CyanoHAB website and the CDC HAB-Associated Illness website.

CDC