Testing – HIV, STD and Viral Hepatitis

Should I Get Tested? Learn whether you are at risk for HIV, STDs or Viral Hepatitis
Where Can I Get Tested? Find out where you can get tested for HIV, STDs or Viral Hepatitis
What If I Test Positive? Discover what resources are available if you test positive for HIV, STDs or Viral Hepatitis

Other Questions? Contact the Virginia Disease Prevention Hotline or CDC Hotline for assistance

Virginia Disease Prevention Hotline   CDC Hotline
1-800-533-4148   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)
hiv-stdhotline@vdh.virginia.gov   1-888-232-6348 TTY
Hotline's Facebook Page   cdcinfo@cdc.gov
Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 am - 5 pm;
CLOSED on Virginia State Holidays
   Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 am - 8 pm

If you feel you may be at risk for any of these conditions, find a testing location near you in the Where Can I Get Tested? tab.

Chlamydia
Chlamydia is the most commonly reported STD in the United States, and can infect both men and women. Any sexually active person can get chlamydia through unprotected vaginal, anal, or oral sex. It can cause infections in the genitals, rectum, and throat. It is a very common infection, especially among young people ages 15-24 years. If you are sexually active, have an open and honest talk with your health care provider and ask whether you should get tested.

You should get a test for chlamydia every year if you are:

  • A sexually active woman younger than 25 years old.
  • An older woman with risk factors such as new or multiple sex partners, or a sex partner who has an STD.
  • A sexually active man who is gay, bisexual or has sex with men. Men who have sex with men and have multiple or anonymous partners should get screened more frequently for STDs, such as at 3-to-6 month intervals.
  • A pregnant woman.  At-risk pregnant women should get tested early in pregnancy, with repeat testing as needed.

Learn more about chlamydia.

Genital Herpes
Genital herpes is a common STD caused by two types of viruses: herpes simplex type 1 and herpes simplex type 2. Most people who have herpes have very mild or no symptoms. You may not notice mild symptoms or you may mistake them for another skin condition, such as a pimple or ingrown hair. Because of this, most people who have herpes do not know it.

Genital herpes sores usually appear as one or more blisters on or around the genitals, rectum or mouth. The blisters break and leave painful sores that may take weeks to heal. These symptoms are sometimes called “having an outbreak.” The first time someone has an outbreak they may also have flu-like symptoms such as fever, body aches or swollen glands.

Repeat outbreaks of genital herpes are common, especially during the first year after infection. Repeat outbreaks are usually shorter and less severe than the first outbreak. Although the infection can stay in the body for the rest of your life, the number of outbreaks tends to decrease over a period of years.

Your health care provider should examine you if you notice any of these symptoms. Learn more about genital herpes.

Gonorrhea
Gonorrhea can infect both men and women. Any sexually active person can get gonorrhea through unprotected vaginal, anal, or oral sex. It can cause infections in the genitals, rectum, and throat. It is a very common infection, especially among young people ages 15-24 years. If you are sexually active, have an open and honest talk with your health care provider and ask whether you should get tested for gonorrhea or other STDs.

You should get tested for gonorrhea every year if you are:

  • A sexually active woman younger than 25 years.
  • A sexually active man who is gay, bisexual or who has sex with men. Men who have sex with men and have multiple or anonymous partners should get screened more frequently for STDs, such as at 3-to-6 month intervals.
  • An older woman with risk factors such as new or multiple sex partners, or a sex partner who has an STD.
  • At-risk pregnant women should get tested early in pregnancy, with repeat testing as needed.

Learn more about gonorrhea.

Hepatitis A Virus (HAV)
Hepatitis A is primarily spread when feces-contaminated objects, food or water enter the mouth. Although anyone can become infected with HAV, if you are able to answer yes to any of the following questions, you may be at increased risk.

  • Have you traveled to, or are you from a country where hepatitis A is common?
  • Are you a family member or caregiver of a recent adoptee from a country where HAV is common?
  • Do you live with someone currently infected with HAV?
  • Are you a man who has ever had sex with another man?
  • Do you use illegal drugs (injection or non-injection use)?
  • Do you have a clotting factor disorder, such as hemophilia?
  • Have you had sexual contact with someone currently infected with HAV?

You may not have symptoms if you are infected with HAV. If you believe you may be infected with or have been exposed to HAV, talk to a medical professional to see if you should get tested. A safe and effective vaccine exists to prevent HAV.

Men who have sex with men and have multiple or anonymous partners should get screened more frequently for STDs, such as at 3-to-6 month intervals.

Learn more about the hepatitis A virus and the hepatitis A vaccine.

Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)
If you are able to answer yes to any of the following questions, you could benefit from an HBV test.

  • Are you a pregnant woman?
  • Were you born in the U.S., but not vaccinated against HBV as an infant AND have at least one parent who was born outside of the U.S.?
  • Were you born to an HBV-infected woman?
  • Are you HIV-positive?
  • Are you on immunosuppressive therapy?
  • Do you have liver disease of an undetermined cause (i.e. elevated ALT/AST)?
  • Do you live with and/or have sex with a person infected with HBV?
  • Are you a man who has ever had sex with another man?
  • Do you currently or have you ever injected drugs?
  • Have you ever exchanged sex for drugs or money?
  • Have you ever been in jail or prison?
  • Were you the source of a blood or bodily fluid exposure (i.e. needle stick injury)?
  • Are you from one of the following geographic regions?
    • Africa (all countries)
    • Asia (all countries)
    • Australia & South Pacific (except Australia and New Zealand)
    • Middle East (except Cyprus and Israel)
    • Eastern Europe (except Hungary)
    • Western Europe (only Malta, Spain, and Indigenous populations in Greenland)
    • North America (only Alaska natives and indigenous populations in northern Canada)
    • Central America (only Guatemala and Honduras)
    • South America (only Ecuador; Guyana; Suriname; Venezuela; and Amazonian areas of Bolivia, Brazil, Columbia, and Peru
    • Caribbean (only Antigua and Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, and Turks and Caicos Islands)

Those infected with HBV may not have symptoms. It may take up to 9 weeks after exposure to test positive for HBV. If any of the above situations apply to you within the past 9 weeks, you may need to get tested again. HBV testing is not recommended for children younger than 9 months old. A safe and effective vaccine exists to prevent HBV.

Men who have sex with men and have multiple or anonymous partners should get screened more frequently for STDs, such as at 3-to-6 month intervals.

Learn more about the hepatitis B virus and the hepatitis B vaccine.

Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)
Anyone born from 1945-1965 should receive a one-time test for HCV.

If you are able to answer yes to any of the following questions, you could benefit from an HCV test.

  • Were you born between 1945 and 1965?
  • Are you a healthcare, emergency medical, or public safety worker who has experienced a needle stick, sharps or mucosal exposure to HCV-positive blood?
  • Were you born to a woman who was infected with HCV?
  • Do you currently or have you ever injected drugs?
  • Do you snort cocaine or use other non-injecting illegal drugs?
  • Did you receive clotting factor concentrates produced before 1987?
  • Were you ever on long-term hemodialysis?
  • Do you have persistently abnormal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels?
  • Are you HIV-positive?
  • Were you notified that you received blood from a donor who later tested positive for HCV infection?
  • Did you receive a transfusion of blood, blood components, or an organ transplant before July 1992?
  • Are you a man who has ever had sex with another man?
  • Have you ever exchanged sex for drugs or money?
  • Are you a long-term sexual partner of someone who is infected with HCV?
  • Have you ever received a tattoo or piercing under substandard infection control procedures?
  • Have you ever been in jail or prison?

There are often no symptoms of HCV until your liver has been severely damaged. The HCV antibody test can detect some infection within 4-10 weeks and nearly all infections by 6 months after an exposure. HCV testing is not recommended for those who are younger than 18 months old. A vaccine for hepatitis C is not currently available.

Men who have sex with men and have multiple or anonymous partners should get screened more frequently for STDs, such as at 3-to-6 month intervals.

Learn more about the hepatitis C virus.

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)
Everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 should get tested for HIV at least once as part of routine health care.

HIV is a virus spread through certain body fluids that attacks the body’s immune system, specifically the CD4 cells, often called T cells. It is the virus that can lead to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or AIDS if not treated. Unlike some other viruses, the human body can’t get rid of HIV completely, even with treatment. So once you get HIV, you have it for life.

People with certain risk factors should get tested for HIV more often. If you were HIV-negative the last time you got tested and answer yes to any of the following questions, you should get another HIV test. These things increase your chances of getting HIV:

  • Are you a man who has had sex with another man?
  • Have you had sex—anal, oral or vaginal—with an HIV-positive partner?
  • Have you had more than one sex partner since your last HIV test?
  • Have you injected drugs and shared needles or works (for example, water or cotton) with others?
  • Have you exchanged sex for drugs, money, housing, food or other items or needs?
  • Have you been diagnosed with or sought treatment for another sexually transmitted disease?
  • Have you been diagnosed with or treated for hepatitis or tuberculosis (TB)?
  • Have you had sex with someone who could answer yes to any of the above questions or someone whose sexual history you don’t know?
  • Have you had unprotected sex?

You should get tested at least once a year if you keep doing any of these things. Sexually active gay and bisexual men may benefit from more frequent testing (for example, every 3 to 6 months). Men who have sex with men and have multiple or anonymous partners should get screened more frequently for STDs, such as at 3-to-6 month intervals.

If you are pregnant, talk to your health care provider about getting tested for HIV and other ways to protect you and your child from getting HIV.

Anyone who has been sexually assaulted should get an HIV test as soon as possible after the assault and should consider post-exposure prophylaxis (nPEP). nPep is a antiretroviral medication you take to prevent infection after potentially being exposed to HIV. You must start taking nPEP within 72 hours of your initial exposure to HIV for the medication to be effective.

Before having sex for the first time with a new partner, you and your partner should talk about your sexual and drug-use history, disclose your HIV status, and consider getting tested for HIV. 

Learn more about HIV.

Human Papillomavirus (HPV)
Human Papillomavirus, or HPV, is a very common virus; nearly 80 million people—about one in four—are currently infected in the United States. HPV transmits through intimate skin-to-skin contact, even from someone without symptoms. You can get HPV by having vaginal, anal or oral sex with someone who has the virus. It is most commonly spread during vaginal or anal sex. HPV is so common that nearly all men and women get it at some point in their lives. It can take years to develop symptoms, which makes it hard to know when you first became infected. In most cases, HPV goes away on its own and does not cause any health problems. When HPV does not go away, it can cause health problems like genital warts and cancer.

Genital warts usually appear as a small bump or groups of bumps in the genital area. They can be small or large, raised or flat, or shaped like a cauliflower. A healthcare provider can usually diagnose warts by looking at the genital area.

HPV cancers include cancer of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis or anus. HPV infection can also cause cancer in the back of the throat, including the base of the tongue and tonsils.

Learn more about HPV.

Syphilis
Any sexually active person can get syphilis through unprotected vaginal, anal or oral sex. Have an honest and open talk with your health care provider and ask whether you should get tested for syphilis or other STDs. Learn how to recognize the signs of syphilis. You should get tested regularly (at least once a year) if you are pregnant, are a sexually active gay, bisexual, or other man who has sex with men (MSM), have HIV infection, and/or have partner(s) who have tested positive for syphilis.

Men who have sex with men and have multiple or anonymous partners should get screened more frequently for STDs, such as at 3-to-6 month intervals.

Learn more about syphilis.


There is No Wrong Door to Testing!

Testing for Hepatitis, HIV, and other STDs are available at local health departments, clinics, community-based organizations, and pharmacies throughout the state. Go to https://gettested.cdc.gov/ to find testing sites close to you, or use the testing site locator widget to the right.

You can also contact your private provider directly to find out if they offer the testing service you need.

For general questions about Hepatitis, HIV and STD testing locations in the state of Virginia, please contact the Virginia Disease Prevention Hotline:

Virginia Disease Prevention Hotline
1-800-533-4148
hiv-stdhotline@vdh.virginia.gov
Hotline's Facebook Page
Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 am - 5 pm;
CLOSED on Virginia State Holidays

 
Local Health Departments
There are over 100 local health department clinics offering STD, HIV, and hepatitis testing services. Find a health department clinic near you. VDH requires your health insurance information and proof of household income for STD, HIV, and hepatitis services. If you do not have health insurance or proof of household income, please ask registration staff for additional information.

Questions about testing at a local health department?
Contact a hotline counselor:
1-800-533-4148
hiv-stdhotline@vdh.virginia.gov
Hotline's Facebook Page

Community-based organizations (CBOs) and non-profits
There are many community organizations, free clinics, and health centers that offer STD, HIV, and hepatitis testing. Most of these centers offer rapid HIV testing, which can give you results in 15 to 20 minutes.

Questions about testing at a CBO or non-profit?
Contact a hotline counselor:
1-800-533-4148
hiv-stdhotline@vdh.virginia.gov
Hotline's Facebook Page

Walgreens Pharmacies
There are over 30 Walgreens stores across Virginia offering free HIV testing. Pharmacists at these stores use INSTI, an HIV antibody test that gives results in 60 seconds. Testing is available on a walk-in basis during the hours when a specially qualified pharmacist is on duty so testing hours may vary. We recommend you call the pharmacy before going in.

Questions about testing at Walgreens?
Contact Pharmacy Testing & Special Projects Coordinator Heather Bronson:
(804) 864-8020
heather.bronson@vdh.virginia.gov

Home Testing for HIV
VDH is currently offering free in-home HIV test kits to all men living in Virginia who fill out the five-minute, confidential survey located at the bottom of this screen or via this Home Testing Survey link. If you are a male living in Virginia and are unsure about using any of the testing locations provided above, please consider our Home Testing Program.

Questions about VDH's Home Testing program?
Contact Community HIV Testing Coordinator Bryan Collins:
(804) 864-7948
bryan.collins@vdh.virginia.gov

Create your own user feedback survey

If you receive a positive Hepatitis, STD or HIV test result and you need to talk to someone about it, please contact a hotline counselor using the contact information below:

Virginia Disease Prevention Hotline   CDC Hotline
1-800-533-4148   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)
hiv-stdhotline@vdh.virginia.gov   1-888-232-6348 TTY
Hotline's Facebook Page   cdcinfo@cdc.gov
Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 am - 5 pm; CLOSED on Virginia State Holidays    Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 am - 8 pm

It is important to notify your sex partner(s) or anyone you share needles with if you test positive for any STDs, HIV, or hepatitis. Your partner(s) need to know that they may have been exposed so they can get tested and treated, if necessary. If your partner is not informed and treated, you could get the infection again. Learn about the several options you have to notify your partner(s). Chlamydia

Chlamydia can be cured with the right medicine. It is important that you take all of the medication your health care provider prescribes to cure your infection. When taken properly it will stop the infection and could decrease your chances of having complications later on. You should not share medication for chlamydia with anyone. Repeat infection with chlamydia is common. You should wait 7 days after you and your sex partner(s) have completed treatment to have sex again. You should get tested again about three months after treatment, even if your sex partner(s) received treatment. Untreated chlamydia may also increase your chances of getting or giving HIV. Learn more about chlamydia.
Genital Herpes
There is no cure for herpes. However, there are medicines that can prevent or shorten outbreaks. A daily pill makes it less likely that you will pass the infection on to your sex partner(s). If you have herpes, you should tell your sex partner(s) and let him or her know that you do and the risk involved. Using condoms may help lower this risk but it will not get rid of the risk completely. Having sores or other symptoms of herpes can increase your risk of spreading the disease. Even if you do not have any symptoms, you can still infect your sex partner(s). Learn more about genital herpes.
Gonorrhea
Gonorrhea can be cured with the right medication. It is important to take all the medication prescribed to cure gonorrhea. When taken properly it will stop the infection and could decrease your chances of having complications later on. Do not share your medication for gonorrhea. You should wait 7 days after you and your sex partner(s) have completed treatment to have sex again. You should get tested again about three months after treatment, even if your sex partner(s) received treatment.  Untreated gonorrhea may also increase your chances of getting or giving HIV. Learn more about gonorrhea.
Hepatitis A Virus (HAV)
HAV is an acute (short-term) disease and does not become chronic (long-term). There is no specific treatment for HAV. It is common to recover on your own after a few months, though you may require hospitalization. After you recover from HAV infection, you are immune from HAV, but not from hepatitis B or hepatitis C. Since HAV affects your liver, lifestyle changes like abstaining from alcohol can reduce your risk of further liver damage. You can prevent the transmission of HAV to others by frequently washing your hands with soap and warm water after using the bathroom, changing a diaper, and before preparing food. Household members and sexual partners of a person infected with HAV should consider getting the vaccine. Learn more about the hepatitis A virus and the hepatitis A vaccine.
Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)
If you are infected with HBV you may have either acute (short-term) or chronic (long-term) disease. If you have acute HBV you can get supportive medical care until your body is able to clear the infection on its own. Depending on your age your chance of developing chronic HBV changes. Ninety percent of infants, 25-50% of children 1-5 years old, and 5% of adults with an acute infection will go on to develop chronic HBV. Chronic HBV can be effectively managed in consultation with a medical professional. You may receive antiviral medications to reduce damage to your liver. Lifestyle changes, like abstaining from alcohol, will reduce your risk of liver damage. You can prevent the transmission of HBV to others by using condoms during sex, and not sharing items such as needles, drug injection equipment, razors, and toothbrushes, which can contain small amounts of infectious blood. The Hepatitis B vaccine is available for all age groups to prevent infection. Virginia also has a program that provides free testing and vaccination to contacts of pregnant woman who are HBV positive. Learn more about the hepatitis B virus, the hepatitis B vaccine, and find treatment near you.
Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)
If you have HCV, you may be diagnosed with acute (short-term) or chronic (long-term) disease. Acute HCV is treated with supportive medical care as necessary. If you are diagnosed with acute HCV you have between 75% and 85% chance of developing chronic HCV. Chronic HCV infection can now be cured in more than 90% of patients taking antiviral medications. Lifestyle changes, like abstaining from alcohol, will reduce your risk of liver damage. You can prevent the transmission of HCV to others by not sharing items such as needles, drug injection equipment, razors, and toothbrushes, which can contain small amounts of infectious blood. Although the transmission of HCV through sex is uncommon, using condoms can also reduce the risk of infecting others. Learn more about the hepatitis C virus. Additional information about can be found at HCV Advocate. Find other facilities in your area that may offer treatment.

For more help, contact Help-4-Hep's Hotline:
1-877-435-7443
http://www.help4hep.org/

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)
You should start medical care and begin HIV treatment as soon as you are diagnosed with HIV. Taking medicine to treat HIV, called antiretroviral therapy or ART, is recommended for all people with HIV. Taking medicine to treat HIV slows the progression of HIV and helps protect your immune system. The medicine can keep you healthy for many years and greatly reduces your chance of transmitting HIV to sex partners if taken the right way, every day. If you’re taking medicine to treat HIV, visit your health care provider regularly and always take your medicine as directed to keep your viral load (the amount of HIV in the blood and elsewhere in the body) as low as possible. Also, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a useful prevention method for couples where one person is HIV positive and the other is HIV negative. Visit VDH's PrEP and nPEP page to learn more about whether PrEP is right for you or your partner. If you are worried about protecting your confidentiality, please read some of our frequently asked questions about partner services. Learn more about living with HIV.
Human Papillomavirus (HPV)
There is no treatment for the virus itself. In most cases, HPV goes away on its own and does not cause any health problems. However, there are treatments for the health problems that HPV can cause. HPV is transmissible even when an infected person has no signs or symptoms. You can develop symptoms years after getting infected, making it hard to know when you first became infected. When HPV does not go away, it can cause health problems like genital warts and cancer. Learn more about HPV and about getting help paying for the HPV vaccine.
Syphilis
Syphilis can be cured with the right antibiotics. However, treatment will not undo any damage that the infection has already caused. If you receive treatment for syphilis, do not have sex with anyone until your lab results indicate the infection has cleared. You must notify your sex partner(s) so that they also can get tested and receive treatment if necessary. Having syphilis once does not protect you from getting it again. Even after you’ve been successfully treated, you can still be re-infected. Only laboratory tests can confirm whether you have syphilis. You should follow-up with your health care provider for additional testing to make sure that your treatment was successful. Learn more about syphilis.