Richmond City Health District


Richmond City and Henrico County Health Departments

Richmond City and Henrico County Health Departments are separate entities that, beginning January 1, 2019, have a shared leadership team.

Henrico County Health Department

The Henrico County Health Department exists and acts to protect the health of communities within Henrico County. These communities include residents, visitors, newly arrived immigrants, pregnant women, infants, school children, and many more. Chances are you are a beneficiary of the health protective services of the Henrico County Health Department if you: eat in a restaurant or cafeteria; need an immunization; live in a house with a well or septic system; received nutritional supplements and counseling while pregnant; experience a foodborne or sexually transmitted illness; experience a death in your family.

The Henrico County Health Department may offer services not available at the Richmond City Health District.



Opioid Crisis

Opioids are a class of drugs that include the illegal drug heroin, synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, and pain relievers available legally by prescription, such as oxycodone (OxyContin®), hydrocodone (Vicodin®), codeine, morphine, and many others.

Every day, more than 115 people in the United States die after overdosing on opioids. The misuse of and addiction to opioids—including prescription pain relieversheroin, and synthetic opioids such as fentanyl—is a serious national crisis that affects public health as well as social and economic welfare. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that the total "economic burden" of prescription opioid misuse alone in the United States is $78.5 billion a year, including the costs of healthcare, lost productivity, addiction treatment, and criminal justice involvement.

 

 

 

Visit the website for the Regional Opioid Taskforce: opioidsolutionsrva.com.

More Opioid  Information

TRAINING RESIDENTS TO BECOME RESCUERS

Persons who complete the REVIVE training are given knowledge and resources needed to save a family member or friend who has overdosed on opioids. REVIVE! is helping people learn how to recognize and respond to opioid overdose emergencies by administering naloxone.


Current Highlights

 

August is National Immunization Awareness Month

Immunizations (also called shots or vaccines) help prevent dangerous and sometimes deadly diseases. Immunization isn’t just for kids. To stay protected against serious illnesses like the flu, measles, and pneumonia, adults need to get vaccinated, too. National Immunization Awareness Month is a great time to promote vaccines and remind family, friends, and coworkers to stay up to date on their shots.

Follow us on social media for regular updates.

 

2019 Tick season is here

Tick season is here and that means it’s time once again for people to protect themselves and their loved ones (including pets) from tick bites.  Last year, nearly 60,000 cases of tickborne disease were reported to CDC by state health departments and the District of Columbia. Though we can’t predict how bad any particular season will be, we know that reducing exposure to ticks is the best defense against Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and other tickborne infections.

For more information on Lyme Disease and tickborne illnesses, visit the new resource: https://www.cdc.gov/media/dpk/diseases-and-conditions/lyme-disease/index.html

 

 

 

 

It's Hurricane Season

Hurricanes don’t only affect people living along the coast. They can still cause damage even if you live hundreds of miles from the shore. If you’re in an area where hurricanes are a risk, you need a plan.

CDC can help you make an emergency plan. Go to Make a Plan: Develop a Family Disaster Plan for help.

Be Ready

Even if there’s no risk of a hurricane right now, make sure you and your family are prepared.

  • Stock up on emergency supplies for your home and car.
  • Write down emergency phone numbers and keep them near every phone in your house or on the refrigerator. Program them into your cell phone, too.
  • Buy a fire extinguisher and make sure your family knows where to find it and how to use it. Read the National Fire Protection Association’s tips for using fire extinguishersExternal.
  • Find out where the nearest shelter is and the different routes you can take to get there if you have to leave your home.
  • Make sure that everyone in your family knows what the warning sirens in your area sound like — and what to do if they go off.

Click here for information on Health Fairs, Outreach and Speaker Request Form,  STI Evening Screening Clinic, Food Safety Training, WIC, Tobacco Free Schools, My Meal Detective and Refugee Program.