Richmond City Health District

RCHD provides a comprehensive set of public health programs and services for Richmond City. RCHD efforts include clinical, field and community based efforts in the area of reproductive health, communicable disease control, various categorical public health programs, environmental health, and disaster preparedness and response.

The mission of RCHD is to promote healthy living, protect the environment, prevent disease and prepare the community for disasters.

The general operation hours at 400 East Cary Street, Richmond, Virginia are Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Current Highlights

REGISTER NOW –  https://regionalopioidsummit2017.sched.com/

FOR MORE INFORMATION CLICK HERE

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Quick Links

Richmond City Health District receives Culture of Health Prize

We are proud to have received the 2017 RWJF Culture of Health Prize, along with seven other communities around the country that are working to improve health. Click Here to learn more.

 

Be Healthy RVA

BeHealthyRVA is a user-friendly, web-based data repository of population health data, evidence-based practices, and information about health resources and activities in the Greater Metro Richmond and Northern Neck regions.

We invite grant writers, community leaders, public officials, employers, educators, and health care providers to use the site as a tool for grant writing, community assessment, strategic planning, and identifying best practices for improvement, collaboration and advocacy. It is our hope that through this tool we can align community health resources, set goals, and track the progress of the fantastic work occurring within our community. Visit http://www.behealthyrva.org/

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Other than skin cancer, breast cancer(https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/) is the most common cancer among American women. Getting mammograms(https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/basic_info/mammograms.htm) regularly can lower the risk of dying from breast cancer. The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends that if you are 50 to 74 years old, be sure to have a screening mammogram every two years. If you are 40 to 49 years old, talk to your doctor about when to start and how often to get a screening mammogram. Learn more at https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/dcpc/resources/features/breastcancerawareness/index.htm

Click here for information on Health Fairs, Outreach and Speaker Request Form,  STI Evening Screening Clinic, Food Safety Training, WIC, Tobacco Free Schools, My Meal Detective and Refugee Program.