Richmond City Health District


The Richmond City Health District offices and clinical services will be closed on December 24 and 25, 2018 for the Christmas holiday. Also, we will be closed on December 31, 2018 for the New Year holiday.


Opioid Crisis

Opioids are a class of drugs that include the illegal drug heroin, synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, and pain relievers available legally by prescription, such as oxycodone (OxyContin®), hydrocodone (Vicodin®), codeine, morphine, and many others.

Every day, more than 115 people in the United States die after overdosing on opioids. The misuse of and addiction to opioids—including prescription pain relieversheroin, and synthetic opioids such as fentanyl—is a serious national crisis that affects public health as well as social and economic welfare. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that the total "economic burden" of prescription opioid misuse alone in the United States is $78.5 billion a year, including the costs of healthcare, lost productivity, addiction treatment, and criminal justice involvement.

More Opioid  Information

TRAINING RESIDENTS TO BECOME RESCUERS

Persons who complete the REVIVE training are given knowledge and resources needed to save a family member or friend who has overdosed on opioids. REVIVE! is helping people learn how to recognize and respond to opioid overdose emergencies by administering naloxone.


Current Highlights

 

Food Safety Tips for the Holidays

Feasting with family and friends is part of many holiday celebrations.  Click here for some simple tips to keep safe from food poisoning, or foodborne illness, during the holidays.

Holiday Health and Safety Tips

The holidays are a great opportunity to enjoy time with family and friends, celebrate life, to be grateful, and reflect on what’s important. They are also a time to appreciate the gift of health. Here are some holiday tips to support your efforts for health and safety this season. Click here to learn more.

What You Should Know for the 2018-2019 Flu Season

Getting a flu vaccine every year is the best way to protect yourself and your family from flu and its potentially serious complications. CDC recommends that everyone 6 months and older get vaccinated by the end of October.

What is new this flu season?

• Flu vaccines have been updated to better match circulating flu viruses
• Any licensed, age-appropriate flu vaccines are recommended
• The nasal spray flu vaccine (LAIV) is again a vaccine option. Ask your health care provider about what vaccine is right for you

Learn more about what’s new for the 2018-2019 flu season.

Click here for information on Health Fairs, Outreach and Speaker Request Form,  STI Evening Screening Clinic, Food Safety Training, WIC, Tobacco Free Schools, My Meal Detective and Refugee Program.