Richmond City Health District


Current Highlights

In September 2017, Richmond was awarded the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Culture of Health Prize, joining just 8 communities selected this year, and 34 other communities across the country to be recognized as leaders in creating opportunities for all residents to live healthier lives.

We are proud to have received the 2017 RWJF Culture of Health Prize, along with seven other communities around the country that are working to improve health. Click Here to learn more.

Health inequality in Richmond is a complicated problem. To improve health for everyone, we need to ask hard questions about history, housing, education, food access, transportation, employment, health care access, and the environment. To address these complex issues, we want to include residents as partners in these conversations, and support residents to become agents of change in their own neighborhoods and families. By coming together as a community we can achieve long-term solutions that really work.

The end goal for Richmond is health equity and a commitment to prioritizing health and opportunity in the policies that govern us, the programs that support us, and the development projects that are changing the landscape of our city.

Richmond won the Culture of Health Prize because we’ve made a good start on this path, but we still have a long way to go before a true Culture of Health exists in our city.  The video above documents this point in our journey, and we look forward to sharing updates as we make progress together in the months and years to come.

You can also view Richmond’s in-depth Culture of Health profile on the RWJF website and learn more about the Culture of Health Prize here (include hyperlink titled RWJF Culture of Health).

https://www.rwjf.org/en/library/articles-and-news/2017/09/2017-culture-of-health-prize--RWJF-awards-eight-communities.html 

 

 


OPIOID

Opioids are a class of drugs that include the illegal drug heroin, synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, and pain relievers available legally by prescription, such as oxycodone (OxyContin®), hydrocodone (Vicodin®), codeine, morphine, and many others.

 Every day, more than 115 people in the United States die after overdosing on opioids.1 The misuse of and addiction to opioids—including prescription pain relieversheroin, and synthetic opioids such as fentanyl—is a serious national crisis that affects public health as well as social and economic welfare. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that the total "economic burden" of prescription opioid misuse alone in the United States is $78.5 billion a year, including the costs of healthcare, lost productivity, addiction treatment, and criminal justice involvement.2

 

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Other than skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women. Getting mammograms regularly can lower the risk of dying from breast cancer. The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends that if you are 50 to 74 years old, be sure to have a screening mammogram every two years. If you are 40 to 49 years old, talk to your doctor about when to start and how often to get a screening mammogram. Visit https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/dcpc/resources/features/breastcancerawareness/index.htm

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for regular breast cancer awareness facts.

October is SIDS Awareness Month

Many parents may have heard about sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, and want more information about how to reduce the risk. About 3,700 infants died of SIDS or other sleep-related deaths in the US in 2015. In honor of SIDS Awareness month, we’re sharing tips with parents and caregivers on our Facebook and Twitter accounts to help reduce the risk of SIDS and other sleep-related infant deaths. Also, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/features/sidsawarenessmonth/index.html for more information.

It's Mosquito Season: Fight The Bite...Prevent Mosquito Borne Disease

Zika and West Nile virus are viral diseases that spread to people through bites of infected mosquitoes. Reducing the numbers of mosquitoes around your home and in the community lowers the risk for mosquito borne illnesses. The most effective and environmentally sound method of reducing the mosquito population is to eliminate the places (stagnant water) where they breed. Richmond residents are encouraged to dump, treat or remove any container on their property that can hold water and allow mosquito larvae to grow.

Learn more about preventing Zika virus at http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/zika/.

Don't get bugged by ticks; they carry disease. Visit http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/environmental-epidemiology/tick-borne-disease-prevention-and-control/ for more information.

Click here for information on Health Fairs, Outreach and Speaker Request Form,  STI Evening Screening Clinic, Food Safety Training, WIC, Tobacco Free Schools, My Meal Detective and Refugee Program.