Indoor Radon Program

ryan-2012 Ryan Paris, Radon CoordinatorGeneral number: (804) 864-8161

Fax number: (804) 864-8175

Email: Ryan.Paris@vdh.virginia.gov

Overview

Exposure to indoor radon, a colorless, odorless radioactive gas, is thought to be the second leading cause of lung cancer, and the leading cause of lung cancer among people who have never smoked.  Exposure to radon may contribute to 21,000 cases of lung cancer each year in the United States, including almost 700 cases per year in Virginia.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) classifies radon risk areas as Zones 1, 2 or 3.  Virginia has 46 counties and 15 cities that are classified as Zone 1 (high risk), and 24 counties and 8 cities classified as Zone 2 (moderate risk).  Click here for a VA risk map.  Testing your home, workplace or other normally occupied area is the only way to know for sure if an indoor radon problem exists.  For more details about radon testing and mitigation, see this page:  Radon Testing & Mitigation Radon informational brochures and documents are available here: Radon Publications.

HOW TO FIND A CERTIFIED RADON PROFESSIONAL

The Code of Virginia requires that Radon testers and mitigators be currently certified by either the National Radon Proficiency Program (NRPP) or the National Radon Safety Board (NRSB).  The links below can be utilized to search for radon testers and mitigators by state or you can narrow search results by zip code.      NRSB      NRPP

HOW TO ORDER DISCOUNTED RADON TEST KITS

VDH is making a limited supply of short-term, do-it-yourself radon test kits available for only a $3 shipping fee.  To order your $3 test kit click on this link.

NEW RADON BROCHURE AVAILABLE FOR HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS:

Health care providers play a key role in reducing their patients’ exposure to unnecessary radiation. With the rate of medical imaging and related radiation exposure increasing, it is even more crucial to reduce radiation exposure from other sources, including radon.  Because radon is a leading environmental cause of cancer mortality in the United States, it is imperative that patients be informed about the health risks of protracted radon exposure and the simple steps they can take to reduce their exposure.  A good source of this information is a guide published jointly by RadonLeaders.org and the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, available by clicking the following link: Radon Publications

 


Office of Radiological Health | 109 Governor Street, 7th Floor | Richmond, VA 23219

Telephone (804) 864-8150 | Fax: (804) 864-8155